Easy Ways To Prepare Gluten Free Quinoa


Gluten Free Quinoa

Gluten free quinoa is a popular food for those diagnosed with Celiac Disease. If you are following the gluten free diet, you may be looking for ways to prepare this grain. This article will cover how to cook and store gluten free quinoa and explore some recipes that use it as an ingredient.

Quinoa: The Basics

A piece of cake covered in cheese

Quinoa is a seed that comes from South America and has been cultivated there since about 3000 BC. It was originally used as a staple crop because of its high protein content, but in recent years it has become more popular as part of the gluten-free diet due to its lack of wheat or barley which contain gluten proteins. To cook the rice like grain, bring water or broth (chicken or vegetable) to a boil, add quinoa and cook until the water has been absorbed (about 15-20 minutes). Quinoa can also be prepared as a cold cereal. Simply use one part dry quinoa to two parts liquid. Bring the mixture to a boil and then simmer for about 10-15 minutes until thickened.

I prefer using chicken broth instead of water because I find that this makes it taste more like rice and helps me avoid potentially unpleasant blandness which sometimes accompanies gluten free foods. If you do not have access to any form of chicken broth, plain warm water can be used in place of chicken or veggie broth– but boiling the quinoa in plain water takes around 25 minutes while cooking with some type of broth usually only takes 15-20.

How to cook gluten free quinoa in the oven

A close up of food

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. If you are using chicken broth, heat it until it reaches boiling point– either over the stove or in the microwave. You do not want to use boiling hot liquid when preparing gluten free quinoa because it may damage the quinoa while stirring and cause pieces of it to explode open (and this can result in unappealing burnt pieces). Add dry quinoa to an oven-safe dish, pour the hot liquid on top of it, stir well, and then cover with aluminum foil. Bake for about 20 minutes or until all of the liquid has been absorbed into the mixture. Gluten free quinoa is usually ready when it has a firm texture and its grains have expanded. Remove the aluminum foil and allow it to cool before storing it in an air-tight container to prevent moisture from building up and causing mold and premature spoilage.

How to cook gluten free quinoa on the stovetop

If you do not want to use your oven or if you simply want to try something new, you can prepare quinoa on the stovetop instead. On the other hand, this method takes longer. Begin by bringing your broth (or water) to a boil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add dry quinoa and reduce heat until the mixture begins simmering (about low heat level). Simmer gently for about 15 minutes, stirring every few minutes to prevent the mixture from sticking. Quinoa is usually ready when all of its liquid has been absorbed. Remove it from the stove and leave it for a little while until you know that it has cooled down enough to be safely handled by your hands. You can put the quinoa in a strainer or colander and rinse extra liquid off with cold water (this can help reduce cooking time). Then transfer quinoa into an air-tight container, seal tightly and store in a cool, dry place until ready to use.

Quinoa recipes

Many dishes use quinoa as one of their ingredients– for example, you can find gluten free pancakes made with this grain along with various types of puffed snacks made with it. Quinoa can also be used in many different kinds of gluten-free desserts– It gives scones, muffins, and cakes a nice texture while adding some additional flavor.

Conclusion

The gluten free lifestyle is becoming more and more popular. With the number of options available, it’s no surprise that this trend has taken off in recent years. But what does a person need to do if they want to go gluten free? We hope you find our guide on how to prepare quinoa helpful!

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